Monday, 14 November 2016

Education is a human right; not a privilege.

Education is a human right; not a privilege.

Learning in EducAid Sierra Leone

It is a good thing actually I never knew at the time that Education is a right for me and other children of Sierra Leone who struggled (and are still struggling) to get an education. In my experience now as a young man, I have learned that education, like all rights, are there to uphold the freedom, respect, and dignity of every human and to treat everyone with fairness. And, I have also learned that my government, to whom I pay my taxes, has a responsibility in upholding and promoting the right of every Sierra Leonean to get an education. Seeing this month’s theme took me down memory lane.

I am specifically remembering the events which took place in my life about nine (9) years ago, forging the new path I was going to walk on. I was then in my first year of junior school and had just promoted to year two when all hell let loose on my mother. Years earlier, my father passed away in the rebel war, leaving my widowed mother with eight children in total. My mother was uneducated, and every day the pressures of paying rent, taking care of us, and sending us to school grew at exponential rates, after some time making it impossible for us to continue school. Our mother broke down to tears, as there was no one to turn to for help. Every few days, one of us, would be asked out of school for not having paid the ever numerous school fees the school requested. I was brilliant, and loved going to school; my teachers said I had a camera brain. But school had become a very difficult place for me to develop my camera brain.

Soon, my elder brother (very bright) dropped out of school, then my elder sister followed and got married instead to a man the age of our father. Mom couldn’t hold on anymore. The curtains were drawing down on our dreams. Our dreams of getting an education; my dream of becoming a doctor, and my twin sister becoming a lawyer flew too far for us to reach – we acquiesced. I learned the lesson, perhaps unconsciously, that education (as is the case with many rights I now know I had in law) is a privilege for those children born of ‘means’. It was a tough lesson for those of us born to poverty, but one well learned.

My hopes of getting educated were kissing the hand of death when I met EducAid. EducAid is a small organisation which provides education to underprivileged young people in Sierra Leone. It had a school open in my hometown of Port Loko. I spoke with my mother, who was in tears, this time of joy, that we can finally continue our education. What was even more relieving was that EducAid schools don’t require uniforms and you can come to school even in bare feet! What have uniforms, and shoes got to do with learning anyway?! I have been in EducAid for the past 9 years now. I attended secondary school free, went to college free. Since 2012, I have been volunteering and working in EducAid where I have the opportunity of helping underprivileged Sierra Leoneans to get an education by teaching, heading schools and leading teacher trainings where we strive to reach thousands more Sierra Leonean children with better learning.

Reflecting on my experience now, a light shines on the sheer magnitude of this problem. There were friends of mine at that time (and so many children right now) who faced a similar fate but did not have the helping hand with which they would have reached their dreams of an education. Many of them are now living in the streets of this country doing odd jobs, and becoming a burden to our society in many direct and indirect ways. Our society (their inaction), our government (their silence), and the rest of the world (their indifference) are violating a fundamental human right which continues to hold our country, and countries like ours in humiliating poverty.


Learning in EducAid Sierra Leone
I want my government and the whole world to know that in my country, and in many other parts of the world, right now, my story is being replayed. There are millions of children around the world at this moment who are being denied the right to true freedom and the capacity to lead a dignified life. Education, as I have come to know it, is the breath that frees the human mind, and capacitates one to lead a dignified life - let us make it a right, and not a privilege for those of means. For in this seed (education) I believe, each and every one of us shall reap the fruits of a more peaceful and prosperous society.  

America votes Donald Trump and Britain voted Brexit, so what?

America votes Donald Trump and Britain voted Brexit, so what?
This is an interesting topic and I will try to make my contribution from an African angle.
America has elected Donald Trump, a businessman with no experience and knowledge in governance, and not very long ago Britain voted to leave the European Union "on what many believe to be xenophobic grounds". What does this mean for Africa? To understand what this means for Africa we have to understand some key factors that motivated these decisions which both sent huge shock waves throughout the world.

Every country has the right to choose their leadership, and the path they want their country to take. However, this decision of choosing the leadership and path a country takes has a lot to say about the people of that country. This can be especially so when it has to do with countries like the United States of America and Britain, whose actions forged a new path for Africa, left an indelible mark on the continent, and whose pervasive social and economic influence still hold great prominence on Africa.

America and Britain are among the richest nations in the world. But I would like to remind you all that the wealth you are sitting on today, and guarding so selfishly was created at the expense of Africa´s growth. While I do not wish for us to dwell on the past and use it as an excuse for not standing up for one self, we must not forget that the deep scars and pervasive ugliness inflicted by Colonialism and the slave trade, which directly fuelled the economic prosperity of both America and Britain, still haunt Africa and the people of African descent.

The wealth brought by the slave trade to Europe provided the capital, and resources that financed and facilitated the industrial revolution that is the cornerstone of the immense wealth possessed by these countries. Interestingly, America and Britain were at the very centre of this trade. While white people had the opportunity to go to school and wander into the new realms of science and technology, the people of Africa were held in darkness that perpetuates to modern times.
 I just cannot believe that America can shamelessly look straight into the eyes of history and choose to vote for a president whose “only response to black Americans is violence and moral degradation”.

Before Trump, the American people gave hope to the world when they choose to elect Barack Obama. It showed the willingness of the American people to break down the trammels of our ugly history and strengthened the position of America as the land of the free, home of the brave. It is thus a shame and a great contradiction that the land of the free and home of the brave decides to vote in favour of a protectionist America, an America intolerant to Muslims, and an America that views immigrants as rapists etc. How pitiful! I cannot help but be awed by the very forgetfulness of Americans that all the wealth and greatness of America was created by African slaves on the plantation farms, and in the large scale export of Africa´s natural resources from which Africa benefitted nothing more than a broken society.

Let us not lose hope entirely. I still believe that not all Americans are blinded enough to support a protectionist America that forgets its historical social responsibility to the world. Donald Trump´s election and the Brexit say a lot about how strongly the drive for more wealth has washed out our society´s moral fibre, but these are errors the American and British people, and perhaps the rest of the world, must do all they can to correct. You cannot take everything from the world and turn around to say they should take care of their mess; the mess Britain and America created in the first place . Americans and Britons, do not forget that you owe the world a historical social responsibility. You paused, broke and reshaped the course of history to create the immense wealth you enjoy today. Instead of gravitating towards protectionist tendencies, let us all work together to break the ugly face of our collective past. Lets be human!
This is a food for thought.

Tuesday, 13 September 2016

We cannot afford to distrust our leadership!

A country this beautiful deserves 'leadership' it can trust!
We cannot afford to distrust our leadership!
A country as beautiful as mine deserves a ‘leadership’ it can trust.
This month’s theme ‘distrust in leadership’ strikes close to my heart. The presence of trust and its absence thereof as one of those things that makes or breaks any relationship from personal ties to business relations may have been clich├ęd in the world of business, but one which still holds quite true. Where trust exists between people amazing things can happen. Even mountains can be moved with ease! On the flip side however, lasting success is a dream too far to grasp wherever trust fails to exist. As said quite often, nothing significant can be achieved where trust is missing. Even in the presence of overwhelming resources at the disposal of an organization.
My conception of this theme of distrust in leadership however goes beyond an organization, though not too far perhaps. Trust remains quite a milestone to be achieved by countries striving for progress and development. You see, this theme of distrust in leadership has helped me to finally make the connection with what Patrick Awuah, founder of Ashesi University once said that “the question of transformation in Africa is a question of leadership.” Now I have come to the conclusion that a nation must have trust in its leadership first before any dream of sustainable growth and development is pursued. What trust am I talking about? A nation must trust its leadership’s capacity in terms of its knowledge, its skills, and its sense of moral uprightness if real safety and growth shall be secured. Where trust fails however, the result can be catastrophic –as it was in the case with Ebola in my country not long ago.
The Ebola epidemic that struck my country not long ago is no news to anyone. But perhaps what many of us did not understand is that underneath the failed efforts to contain the disease at the outset was a huge mountain of distrust in the leadership itself. This was largely why almost 13,500 Sierra Leoneans contacted the dreadful virus, and nearly 4,000 lost their lives. Had there been trust in the leadership things would have been very different.
But wait, who are the leaders? I am talking about the doctors. I am talking about the nurses, the teachers, the media journalists, and the thousands more of Sierra Leoneans who stood at the waterfronts of the Ebola fight. These ‘leaders’ were the ones responsible for making the day-to-day decisions that held so much power over life and death during the very long months of the epidemic. In my opinion, it was this huge level of suspicion felt by the local communities towards the leadership; the doctors, the nurses, and the thousands more of emergency staff made up of Sierra Leoneans from all walks of life that made containing the virus almost impossible when the outbreak was youngest, and perhaps easiest to contain.
This distrust in our country’s leadership, illustrated by the Ebola epidemic, is quite founded. The pervasive nature of corruption in our country's way of life has left us very suspicious of authority. Even very honest intents can be judged with scornful eyes as this may just be yet another person trying to take their own piece. This same corruption is one of those factors that fueled the distrust that propelled our country into a decade-long civil war that claimed the lives of thousands of Sierra Leoneans. How this civil war devastated our country cannot be overstated. Yet, as recently as 2016 we are ranked among the top 10 most corrupt nations in the world! It should not surprise one then that we still have among the lowest life expectancy in the world, the highest number of children who die under the age of five, and we still rank among the lowest in the human development index. These all come as no surprise to a nation fraught with corruption.  
But Let us make no mistake. We have a way of tackling or starting to tackle this problem. It may be easier to solve than it may seem. It is our educational system that trains professionals that are unethical and grossly under skilled to handle matters of national development and security. If the school is where we train these leaders, it is therefore the best place to start our work of rebuilding trust in our leadership.  The first step is for us to go back to the drawing board and revitalize our educational system. All we need to do is to get serious about securing and channeling resources into rebuilding our nation by rebuilding an educational system that successfully trains a trustworthy leadership. Above all, it has been said that nations that succeed are serious about how they train their leaders. Let us do the same! Let's get serious about training our leaders!
You can support education that builds trust
But your are not in Sierra Leone, and probably not in education. What can you do to help build trust in leadership? The Ebola epidemic may be unique to Sierra Leone and its neighboring Guinea and Liberia, but instances of distrust in leadership exist all over the world. You can guide discussions whenever possible towards the importance of building trust in leadership as a key component of any succeeding nation, any succeeding organization, or business for that matter. You can also volunteer your effort and or resources towards supporting education that builds a stronger society.
On a final note, I believe you will agree with me that the process of building trust in leadership bends around how well we train our leaders with the knowledge, skills, and the moral firmness that build trust which is the cornerstone of all sustainable development and management of a country in a crisis. Had there been trust in our leadership, the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone, and perhaps neighboring Guinea and Liberia may not have devastated our countries the way it did.
A country as beautiful as mine deserves leadership it can trust.
Thank you.

Thursday, 11 August 2016

Migration is only a symptom of the actual problems

Migration is only a symptom of the actual problems

Say the word Africa, and see what comes into most people’s minds first. Not the green, beautiful, exotic, virgin, wealth endowed continent that it truly is. Africa now connotes the harshest extremes of poverty, violence, disease, hunger, corruption and helplessness. The image of this beggar Africa is the repellent that is suffocating, and chasing away the youngest, most skilled, and the most talented of Africa to flee their homes in exchange for an ‘opportunity’ to live in Europe, further plunging the continent into even deeper misery. Africans either escape at all costs or stay risking their dreams and ambitions dying with them. Those who endure the pains of this suffocation either stay  and pass on their poverty to their next generation, or they take the driver’s seat. Now away from the realities of real poverty, they have forgotten their past. They have become the new oppressors themselves.

I am a Sierra Leonean, an African born in the early days of our country’s civil war. In the first decade of my life I have experienced the bitter realities of war, of losing my father and very close relatives. In the second decade of my life I have experienced the bitter realities of sleeping on an empty stomach, my brothers and close relatives dying of easily treatable diseases, and the crushing effects of a corrupt society. I endured the pains of my brothers and sisters (and almost I) dropping out of school because our mother cannot afford to bear the huge costs of sending all of her children to school.

I am at the start of my third decade now. Up until now, my only dream has been that of getting highly educated and living in Europe, turning the tables around for myself and my family. I was dreaming of becoming a medical doctor by then. Things changed for the better and I am presently a teacher.  Actually, my mother still prays for that ultimate luck, the day I escape the shores of my country to live overseas. That way, I shall be sending money so my family can build houses, open shops, become a wealthy family, and live happily forever after. But where does this leave my already poverty-striken country? Almost every young person in my community is desperate to run away to Europe and find the green pastures they need to forage for success. Many fellow Africans have lost their lives and their dignity in this process.

Sierra Leone’s schools are also seriously disadvantaged. How able is a poorly trained, under-paid, and ill-supervised teacher to deliver effective instruction to a hungry child, enduring the heavy weight of poverty in his daily life in a school where children have to sit on the floor, and where learning has to be stopped any time it rains because the school doesn’t have a roof? Well, this situation is not uncommon in my country. Except if you spend all of your time helping Africa hiding in the cities or big towns, and not in the very many rural areas where you find the Africa really needing help.

Sierra Leone's schools are also disadvantaged in that national and international scholarships, by the nature of how they are organised and supervised seem to have become the entitlement of only those whose relations hold positions of influence, not those actually needing help. Such a system leaves many young talented people disgruntled and in a constant search of routes to escape.

To reduce the disadvantages, those governments and agencies organising schemes to help Africa should invest instead in strengthening African educational institutions. This is more sustainable if the impetus remains to help transform Africa, and not merely a business strategy by rich countries using Africa to achieve their goals. There must be stronger mechanisms to ensure that aid reaches people truly needing help, not just thrown into the pockets of the already rich.

I believe that our trends of migration can only be put under control when the world takes proactive steps to reduce the concentration of disadvantages in countries like ours. We need support in promoting high quality education, food security and health, infrastructural development, good governance, and the provision of adequate life opportunities for all. Then, young people like me may not need to migrate as much given that their countries too can provide the greener pastures needed for success.  What is happening in Syria, Nigeria, C.A.R, recently with Ebola etc., and their effects on migration in far corners of the world gives a clear illustration that the peace, security and lasting prosperity of the world depends on the peace, security, and lasting prosperity of each and every country of the world no matter how small or remote.

Invest in managing the concentration of  disadvantages in every country and people have less need to migrate. Let us make every country of  the world a better place to be and a miracle awaits us. Until then, we are just getting started.


Tuesday, 19 July 2016

I failed! Or should I say Society failed me, and it was not my fault.

Society failed me, and it was not my fault; Story by Alusine Barrie.

Standing in the face of such a beautiful, respected and powerful young lady seeking help, I feel sure that something is going to happen. Eyes wide open firing a brilliant, vigilant and scowling gaze onto the wall opposite like a scarecrow in the seasons of ripe in my village. Questions shooting from the deep of my heart, worn out tear sacks burst open, a sorrowful spring of tears flowing from its pores, it is happening, just as I knew it would. It is all coming back to me now,  it has only just happened. Wow!
Was it my fault to be born a girl? Why has it been so difficult to be me? The battered life I now live is the relic of age-long discrimination and subordination of all women in my community. Countless numbers of girls are suffering through the same ordeal shoved down my throat while I was just a budding young girl . Why is this silence so loud?!
I was only eight years old, if I can still remember. Or perhaps even younger when men (very old ones) started investing in my sexuality. Men older than my father, my uncles started bringing gifts saying jokingly “ mother-in-law, this money is for my new wife’s nappy.” Or perhaps, as it turned out to be, it wasn’t a joke at all.
As I grew up, more gifts, money and favours took a different pace. My mother and father seemed proud to have been the parent of such beautiful fruit. I experienced the title of ‘wife’ at a very tender age. This all seemed so ‘normal’ in my village that I also started conceding to be ‘happy’ and looking forward to it!
The opportunity cost of staying and working hard in school and the very frail possibility of reaching to university as a ‘girl’ was thoroughly contrasted by the ease with which I reaped the fruits of my sexuality; of my just being a beautiful young girl; ‘a fine pikin’ as they would say. And even better, my parents preferred the quicker profits of giving birth to a girl to that of tedious education.
It was the same all over my village. And even the surrounding villages that I get to visit on luma days (market days). Everyone of us seemed to enjoy this immoral predatory tendency.
At the age of 11, as the ‘my wife’ logo started to get more serious and practical, I started giving up on the tedious work at school. I came to prefer learning to take my rightful, and perhaps, only possible place in society; a wife. This seemed and was made more natural by the norms and traditions of my village.
At 12 years, it all cracked open as I was informed that I shall be marrying the Pa Komrabai (the regent chief) of the neighbouring village of Kamabai. I was asked to bring honour to my family, and I dared not defy the sacred word of my parents lest I become disowned. It was less devastating that I accepted, so I did.
I was very well taken care of by my husband as the ‘batheh’ (sweet heart) as I was called by the chief’s friends and kinsmen. I became very effective in my office of ‘wife’ (and batheh for that matter). I gave birth to so many children in no time!
Clearly the new role of ‘mother’ withered away my beauty and my grand title of ‘batheh’ as I soon started looking old and saggy. While I suffered, my ‘husband’, the chief, was out looking for another ‘batheh’ to add to his growing team of farming and child-bearing slaves.
Now, here I am, looking at a very young lawyer. How I long to be like her! I hear she is 27 years old! I failed! Or should I say Society failed me,but it was not my fault.

Thursday, 30 June 2016

It was not my fault
Was it my fault to be born a girl? Why has it been so difficult to be me? The battered life I now live is the relic of age-long discrimination and subordination of all women in my community. Countless numbers  of girls are suffering through the same ordeal shoved down my throat . Why the loud silence to such a disease with conspicuously devastating effects?
I was only eight years old, if I can still remember. Or perhaps even younger when men (very old ones) started investing in my sexuality. Men older that my father, my uncles started bringing gifts saying jokingly “ mother-in-law, this money is for my new wife’s nappy.” Or perhaps, as it turned out to be, it wasn’t a joke at all.
As I grew up, more gifts, money and favours took a different pace. My mother and father seemed proud to have been the parent of such beautiful fruit. I experienced the title of ‘wife’ at a very tender age. This all seemed so ‘normal’ in my village that I also started conceding to be ‘happy’ and looking forward to it!
The opportunity cost of staying and working hard in school and the very frail possibility of reaching to university as a ‘girl’ was thoroughly contrasted by the ease with which I reaped the fruits of my sexuality; of my just being a beautiful young girl; ‘a fine pikin’ as they would say. And even better, my parents prefered the quicker profits of giving birth to a girl to that of tedious education.
It was the same all over my village. And even the surrounding villages that I get to visit lumor days (market days). Everyone of us seemed to enjoy this immoral predatory tendency.
At the age of 11, as the ‘my wife’ logo started to get more serious practical, I started giving up on the tedious work at school. I came to prefer learning take my rightful and perhaps only possible place in society; a wife. This seemed and was made more natural by the norms and traditions of my society.
At 12 years, it all cracked open as I was informed that I shall be marrying the Pa Komrabai the regent chief of the neighbouring village of Kamabai. I was asked to bring honour to my family, and I dared not defy the sacred word of my parents lest I become disowned. It was less devastating that I accepted.
I was very well taken care of by my husband as the ‘batheh’ (sweet heart) as I was called by the chief’s friend and kinsmen. I became very effective in my office of ‘wife’ (and batheh for that matter). I gave birth to many children in no time!
Clearly the new role of ‘mother’ withered away my beauty and my grand title of ‘batheh’ and started looking old and saggy. While I suffered, my ‘husband’, the chief, went out to look for another ‘batheh’ to add to his growing football team of farming and child-bearing slaves.

Now, here I am, looking at, a young lawyer. How I long to be like her! I heard she is 27 years old! Society failed me and it was not my fault.
Democracy must go to school!

I have never really woken up until today when I set my eyes on these words from former US president, "Democracy cannot succeed unless those who express their choice are prepared to choose wisely. The real safeguard of a democracy, therefore, is education." -Franklin D Roosevelt.
 A few steps on, the words of former UN Secretary General shot at me from another chart on a wall. "Education is a human right with immense power to transform. On its foundation rest the cornerstones of freedom, democracy and sustainable human development."-Kofi Annan.

 Questions shot out of every corner inside my head! If education is so crucial to the freedom, democracy and sustainable development, and we do have an educational system, then one of our task then is  to focus on the training of our next generation in a way that makes them productive citizens able to champion their personal and communal development. What can we do as a nation to ensure that education serves its rightful purpose in building our democracy? One thing comes to my mind: (as radical as it may sound) 
Let's take democracy to our schools! It's the right place to begin!

I am often confused by the very lack of will to shake up those ways of thinking that have rendered us unable to unleash the great potential hidden within our great nation and the African continentHelping our country escape the powerful clutches of corruption and poverty is arguably one of the biggest challenges facing Sierra Leone today. The process producing true development needs the helping hand of a meaningful education system. We have currently failed to consciously help our young people to understand what democratic processes really are, and how to become well informed, involved and productive citizens in a democratic context. Yet, we carry on dreaming of prosperity. It is like making a bed of thorns and hoping to find comfort lying in it!

The ways of thinking and behaving learned  in schools in turn get applied into society -for good or for bad. For example if I have learned in school that my voice doesn’t matter, that success is money, cars, big houses, passing exams,  and 'things'. Or say girls cannot be made leaders, that the wisdom of authorities is unquestionable, or that the only way out of poverty is pulling out a corrupt trick –and no one is going to do anything about it, then these learned behaviors and ways of thinking become the filter through which I see, act towards, and evaluate myself and others. Just as the saying goes it’s impossible to teach an old dog new tricksNo matter what, young people will learn to implement the ways they have seen adults make decisions in their community. Are decisions made by bringing people together to find a collective voice? Are all members supported to have a stronger voice? Are we teaching children to care about not just themselves? Questions like these prompts one to start seeing that without a more proactive education system, sorry to be blunt,  our dreams of prosperity and sustainable development will only remain to be dreams.

 School is where we train young people to take up critical roles in our society. Hence, to do a good job at this, we must ensure to reinvent our thoughts regarding education and take radical action to make it fulfill its rightful purpose. If schools are just a place to get basic skills and paper qualifications we are doomed. Young people need to be able to think critically, to believe that their voices matter, and actively participate in decision making processes in addition to those formal skills they need to be productive citizens in today’s modern world.

The solution? Let us take democracy into our schools! Let us go in there, involve children and instill the values and attitudes of a true democracy. I believe this is our only hope if we are to achieve our important dreams of lasting development and prosperity. Actively simulating democracy in our schools is what we need if we are to stamp out the forces of extreme poverty, denying millions of Sierra Leoneans the means to lead a dignified life, able to fully participate in nation building and security.

Where do we start? We need a radical change to happen! For this radical change to happen, you and I who believe in a truly democratic Sierra Leone must put hands and voices together and take the challenge of driving this revolution towards towards a new face for Sierra Leone. The first step, in my opinion, involves encouraging government, schools, and other agencies wishing to help Sierra Leone to directly involve young people in all matters of the planning, design, implementation and evaluation of all programs and interventions affecting their lives. Is that not democracy?

The result will be a highly skilled population with a higher sense of personal responsibility to hold themselves and others to account and think with a democratic perspective. Isn’t that a good thing? Or should we wait until they are too old and out of school? When we have directly and indirectly taught them that their voices do not matter?

I passionately agree with the words of Franklin D Roosevelt and Kofi Annan, in education lie the hope for saving our society and achieving our president's agenda for prosperity and a truly independent Sierra Leone.
If we are passionate enough, I believe we can.
In the next couple of posts we shall start looking at what this really means in the Sierra Leonean context.
Thank you.
Let's begin!

Wednesday, 29 June 2016

On the streets of Freetown, poem by Alusine Barrie.

Hope, Where can I find you here?
On the streets of Freetown: by Alusine Barrie
Oh hope! Give up not though
As thy courage worn I thin and saggy
Crossing cycles of seasons you stood my camel
Crossing endless nights of toil convincing
Weakened phalanges to keep
Grinding you bore my burden
Through the dark dank blackholes of corporate Salone sniffing
Like angry dogs of beautiful African huntsmen; nothing
Thoroughly stuffed with fellow prisoners, panting
In a bale of new junk clothes headed for Africa
The young walls of my heart broken, crumbling,
Exiled in my own country
You kept me moving
Oh hope! Give up not though
As thy courage worn I thin and saggy
Throat dry like sweetened rivers of African Sahara of
Deserts lost and thoroughly stripped yet
You kept a slow and steady makambo in the quiet of my mind
Crossing cycles of seasons you stood my camel
Shoes giving up the cool of molten tarmac of days in vain
Perforated by a million stitches of tired cobblers; injections
In the unforgiving streets of Freetown, you
You kept me moving
Wide-eyed kinsmen drawing down faded curtains of hope; waiting
Reluctant fruits of a tree so well tended
In a society, had I known better
Not to trust your wisdom
So give up not though
Thy courage worn I thin and saggy
I trusted to follow your hand
Like a blind man in the unforgiving streets of Freetown
Where hope is choked to death
I fulfilled my own end of the bargain
Of thousands of years the masters pouring my vessel; of nothing
Worth my while, I stand by you
So ready us our defeated bodies for
At dawn we sail the blues

For every day is its own matrix.

What's this all about?

I have a dream!

I have a dream of a Sierra Leone where educated citizens come together to tackle poverty, corruption, and promote sustainable development using the mighty instrument of Education.

This blog will be a reflection of my thoughts on education in and out of the classroom. It will also reflect the thoughts of fellow Sierra Leoneans as we sail through the ups and downs of making this dream a reality.

 This blog will create a platform for sharing perspectives and ideas with fellow educators and those working to see real change in the African continent.

I believe in the truth that a society is never doomed to fail forever! Every point can be a new beginning. Let's begin!